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Co Create


Big ideas made great through collaboration

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Co Create


Big ideas made great through collaboration

Everyone has got an idea but what makes one great? A solid foundation of knowledge and a development process is what makes the difference. Chijoff+Co's CoCreate  methodology drives fresh thinking with a collaborative approach, providing your project with the best opportunity for success.

CoCreate is built upon a simple philosophy, collaboration. Great solutions are found through the exchange of ideas, differing approaches, robust discussions and through teamwork. We see everyone involved in a project as part of the team. Whether client or manufacturer, supplier or staff, each have their own valuable contribution to make. 

CoCreate is a product design process that can be tailored to suit your needs. As individual we all are, so to are our projects. The following pages outline some of the stages that are incorporated within CoCreate.

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Research


Building the Foundation

Research


Building the Foundation

Any great design solution is built upon a solid foundation of research. It helps guide the product development process as information is revealed. Design research covers a multitude of areas depending on the project, from science and technology, economic and and social through to compliance and legal. It is also an onging process that runs integrally with the product design process.

Some of the areas that may be covered during the research stage include:

  • Market and Trend analysis
  • Competitor product analysis
  • Material technologies
  • Manufacturing technologies
  • Ergonomic analysis
  • Compliance/ standards

During the research stage there are often unexpected findings, from similar products and new compeditors through to changes in markets and new opportunities. Knowledge is a powerful tool and one that allows perceived weaknesses to become strengths. This is the reason why it is an integrated tool used throughout the product development process. 

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Ideation + Concepts


Picking our brains

Ideation + Concepts


Picking our brains

Coming up with ideas and concepts to solve design challenges is just what makes us tick. We love working with our clients to drive solutions. Through workshops or fast track concept, this collaborative approach reduces time frames and engages stakeholders in the Co create process.

Some of the ideation or brainstorming methods utilized in our product development process include:

  • Body storming
  • Character Profiles
  • Behavioral mapping
  • User Interviews
  •  Rapid prototyping
  • Scenarios
  • A day in the life (putting yourself in the users place)
  • Problem Analysis
  • Backcasting and more

Ideation, or the better known idea generation process, aims to deliver a multitude of solutions to your ideas, problems or opportunities. There are many different ways to achieve a result and exploring the variations allows us to find the most appropriate way forward...often it is the most challenging ideas provide the greatest insights.

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Concept Development


Revealing the potential of an idea

Concept Development


Revealing the potential of an idea

Developing products, services or systems rely on a great foundation of ideas and concepts. From the start of the concept development process the initial ideas are assessed and the best solution chosen. From here we undertake a process that seeks to uncover more of the innovation detail.

There are many factors that influence the concept development process. These include elements such as:

  • Physical attributes (size, colour shape, features, etc)
  • User aspects (portability, ease of use, expected price point
  • Manufacturing (potential methods, assembly, disassembly, etc
  • Sustainability (possible materials, processes, logistics, etc)
  • Market intelligence (aesthetic projection, positioning, target demographic, etc)

Often initial prototypes are developed (otherwise known as rough mockups) that are used to evaluate elements of the concept. Often they are made form soft materials such as cardboard or foam to assist a rapid development process. Some of the elements evaluated could include the functional, aesthetic or even how a potential user interacts with the innovation.

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Detailed Design


Yes... The Devil Is In The Detail

Detailed Design


Yes... The Devil Is In The Detail

This is true with any product development and why it is so important through the Co-create process. The detailed design stage takes the developed concept and works through all of the elements ensuring that no stone is unturned.

Elements that are often worked through include:

  • Physical characteristics including mechanical, chemical, functional and aesthetic
  • User interaction and Ergonomics
  • Material selection and specification
  • Manufacturing methodologies and requirements
  • CAD (3D modelling) including the generation of parts, assemblies, general assemblies
  • Bills of material and technical documentation

The ability to create comprehensive and understandable technical documentation is vital to the manufacturing processes. This is especially the case when dealing with manufacturing facilities often located abroad. Effective communication is key and helps mitigate issues that can often plague offshore manufacture. Other key areas of documentation include quality assurance and manufacturing guides, service manuals through to user guides. All these documents assist in proving integrity to the entire supply chain, from manufacturer through to consumer.

Often simulated testing is utilised within the Detailed Design process. One such method is FEA (Finite element Analysis) which enable designs to be tested and their functionality and performance verified. Some of the factors that can be assessed can include structural, fatigue, vibration and thermal analysis.

 

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Prototyping + Testing


Where imagination and reality converge

Prototyping + Testing


Where imagination and reality converge

Prototyping is a critical part of the industrial design process. Conceptual designs have the opportunity to now be physically tested, ensuring they meet the needs of the client and end user. It is only through this stage that a design begins to take shape.  With our own rapid prototyping facility, designs are able to be created, evaluated and refined fast. 

Prototypes can be made form many different material and process depending on the required design. These can include:

  • SLS (Selective Laser Sintering)
  • SLA (Stereolithography)
  • Object® Printing
  • FDM (Fused Deposition Modelling)
  • CNC (Computer Numerical Control)

In addition other features that can often be incorporated into prototypes include:

  • Detailed graphics
  • Vacuum metalising or Chrome Plating
  • Functional keypads
  • Illumination of screens with on/off switch
  • OEM components such as micro cameras, video screens, fibre optics
  • Target product weight representation
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Design Refinement


Closing the loop

Design Refinement


Closing the loop

Part of any product design/ industrial design process is the need for refinement. Prior to the production of a prototype a design concept is based in theory. Whilst every effort is made to work through the theoretical it is not until you have the physical embodiment of an idea that you can evaluate it. 

The Design Refinement stage takes all of the findings from the prototyping and testing stage and assess which are important or critical to the success of the product/service. It is often through this that you find a product or service being used in a way that was unexpected. This can often lead to exciting opportunities and open up new markets previously overlooked.

The Refinement process makes all of the necessary changes required, which could include:

  • Design adjustments
  • Material updates and changes to specifications
  • Updating CAD models, Bills of Materials and technical documentation
  • Manufacturing guidelines and specifications

Depending on the results found, further prototyping and testing may be required to ensure the design meets the end user requirements. This refinement cycle is the best way to ensure the design performs as expected. Once the desired result is reached the design then progresses to the manufacturing stage.

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Manufacturing


Making It a reality

Manufacturing


Making It a reality

At the end of the day every design, whether a product or service, needs to be realised. The manufacturing stage is key to the success of any innovation, for it is here that the smallest variances can have significant impact on the original design. Manufacturing of components, assemblies or entire products can be arrange locally of internationally. Working with manufacturers and suppliers ensure that elements such as tooling and production runs through to logistics deliver the original design concept to the end user.